An Optimistic Tomorrow

The passage that intrigued my attention the most in H.G Wells Story “The Star” is found on page 41 of the Wesleyan Anthology of Science Fiction towards the middle of the page. The quote is as followed,

“The leader writers enlarged upon the topic; so that in most of the capitals of the world, on January 3rd, there was an expectation, however vague, of some imminent phenomenon in the sky; and as the night followed the sunset around the globe, thousands of men turned their eyes skyward to see- the old familiar stars just as they has always been” (Wells, 41).

What draws me to this passage is the vagueness of the language which to me symbolizes man’s ignorance of their own world and its place in the universe. Man’s constant push for scientific progress causes mankind too constantly look toward the stars and ask questions, questions that when answered engender fear and speculation. H.G Wells suggests through his story “The Star” that even though mankind may face unseen threats in the form of colliding planets, erupting volcanoes, and 50ft waves of crushing water; in the end the dust will settle and men will look up at the same old familiar stars and exclaim, “I am still here.”

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